Interested in the science behind functional activities?

– Head of research Rasmus Friis explains

A pleazer is an active break for your well-being

Why do it?

  • Increased muscular coordination and activation

  • Reduces risk of “office injuries” as well as muscle and joint pain

  • Increases stability, flexibility and mobility of joints.

The science

By doing stretching and functional training exercises the nervous signaling to the working muscles increases. The increased signaling activates the muscles used and improves the muscular coordination between the muscles around your joints. 

The improved muscular coordination and activation positively affect the stability, flexibility and mobility of the joints and muscles, thereby reducing the risks of office injuries such as neck, shoulder, back pain and mouse-related RSI (repetitive strain injury).

Research has demonstrated that two minutes of calisthenics is an efficient way to quickly increase your heart rate. Do you want to reduce weight gain or just stay in shape? Two minutes of calisthenics every hour during your workday is an easy way to do it.

Take-home message

  • Studies have shown that 4 repetitions of 30 seconds stretching are the most effective if performed 3-4 times daily.
  • When performing calisthenics, the greater groups of muscles and the majority of the body’s joint are activated which improves the strength and stability of the body, preventing fall injuries. 

Bedtime reading if you are a nerd like us

Carter, S. E., Jones, M., & Gladwell, V. F. (2015). Energy expenditure and heart rate response to breaking up sedentary time with three different physical activity interventions. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD, pp. 503-509.

Schlumberger, A. (2011). Strength and Conditioning as a Rehabilitation Tool. In M. Cardinale, R. Newton, & K. Nosaka, Strength and Conditioning – Biological Principles and Practical Application (pp. 413-423). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Widmaier, E. P., Raff, H., & Strang, K. T. (2014). Cardiovascular Physiology. In E. P. Widmaier, H. Raff, & K. T. Strang, Vander’s Human Physiology – The Mechanisms of Body Function (pp. 363-445). New York: McGraw Hill.

Widmaier, E. P., Raff, H., & Strang, K. T. (2014). Neuronal Signaling and the Structure of the Nervous System. In E. P. Widmaier, H. Raff, & K. T. Strang, Vander’s Human Physiology – The Mechanisms of Body Function (pp. 138-190). New York: McGraw Hill.

Widmaier, E. P., Raff, H., & Strang, K. T. (2014). Respiratory Physiology. In E. P. Widmaier, H. Raff, & K. T. Strang, Vander’s Human Physiology – The Mechanisms of Body Function (pp. 446-489). New York: McGraw Hill.

This post is also available in: Danish